Coleman and AGM 520/M1941 stoves

This model stove was used by the U.S. military during World War II. The Coleman version is called the 520 and the American Gas and Machine (AGM) seems to go by model M1941, but it seems that the 520 is the manufacturer’s designation and M1941 is the military designation. I think using either is fine, but it seems like most people call the Coleman a 520 and the AGM, M1941. I have three of these type of stoves an AGM model made in 1941, a Coleman made in 1943 and a Coleman made in 1944. If you’re interested in stoves like this be sure to check out the forums at Coleman Collectors Forum and Spiritburner.  There’s also a brief history of this stove on the wiki. After a period of observation and study, I became aware of the somewhat minor differences between them. I decided to enter it on my blog so I could use it as a reference. I’ll probably add to this post from time-to-time.

(left to right) 1941 AGM, 1943 Coleman, 1944 Coleman

(left to right) 1941 AGM, 1943 Coleman, 1944 Coleman

Tanks

AGM Tanks

AGM tanks are made from steel for 1941-1943 and then brass for 1944 and 1945 (Update 15MAY2016: In the last few months I’ve seen two 1944 AGM tanks which were steel. So, either the information I had is incorrect or AGM switched to brass during 1944 resulting in some 1944 tanks being made from steel and others made from brass). AGM made the brass tanks too thin and they have a tendency Continue reading

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M-1950 Cooking Stove

 

M-1950, Coleman 1951 as I found it

M-1950, Coleman 1951 as I found it

I’ve got a handful of the U.S. Army’s M-1950 stove. My father had one of these and an M-1942 MOD stove which he stored in the garage rafters when I was a kid. Sometimes I would climb up there and take them down and play with them (never lit them, though). The moving parts were interesting and thinking about them years later sparked a renewed interest in them and got me started on collecting Continue reading

Pretiss Waber M1942 Stove Rebuild

I mentioned some weeks ago that I may have a new hobby. What began as a curiosity based on some old military stoves my father owned when I was a kid has turned into regular searches on ebay for trashed-out stoves and lanterns and many evenings tinkering with my purchases in the garage. But, if I’m not building boats at the moment this seems like an interesting thing to do.

The Prentiss Waber M-1942-MOD

The Prentiss Waber M-1942-MOD “Mountain” Stove

A month ago I purchased two Prentiss Wabers M-1942-MOD(ified) “Mountain” Stoves. Both are dated, PW-1-45 (PW = Prestiss Wabers). These stoves were made collectively, I believe, by Coleman, Prentiss Wabers (a.k.a Preway) and Aladdin. When I received the first one, I was working on two other stoves, so I didn’t   Continue reading