M-1942 MOD – Minimal Effort to Blue Flame

M-1942 MOD Stove Outdoors

A 1944, M-1942 MOD Stove

 

Fettle – When used as a verb, “I am going to fettle this stove”, means to set in order, get ready.

So, you’ve got yourself an old stove and you’re thinking, “Let’s see if it works!” after all, if you don’t fire it up how will you know if there’s something wrong with it, right? Well, that would be one dangerous way to discover that the 70 year-old fuel cap gasket or valve stem graphite packing doesn’t seal so well and after you light it you discover, to your surprise, that   Continue reading

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Buying an M-1942 Stove

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Here’s a 1945 Prentiss Wabers M-1942 MOD stove as I bought it (left) and after cleaning it up (right)

Last spring, I bought a 1945 Prentiss Wabers M-1942 MOD for $18 at an antique mall. I took it home, cleaned it up, and it works well. This year (2017), I watched a 1943, Aladdin M-1942 wheel stove sell on ebay for $530. Why the big difference?

Well, before we get started, let me say that the market (the buyer and seller) determines the price of an item, which is especially true in the used item market. So, my purpose behind writing this blog is to share observations   Continue reading

The M-1942 “Mountain Stove”

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M-1942 MOD

In November 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Finland in what is known as the Winter War . The battle lasted just over 3 months and ended with the Moscow Peace Treaty in March of 1940. The Soviet forces greatly outnumbered the Finnish military in soldiers, aircraft and tanks, however, their losses were more than 5 times greater. Many around the globe took notice of the Finn’s guerrilla tactics, using ski troopers on cross-country skis and wearing white capes as camouflage. It is also interesting   Continue reading

Coleman 501 Camp Stove

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1962 Coleman 501

The Coleman 501 camp stove was a short-lived stove from 1962, which was recalled for safety reasons, and succeeded by the safer and more successful 502.

Before I talk too much about the 501 stove, I need to make clear that this stove was recalled by Coleman for good reasons, and if you want a stove for regular use, you should steer clear of this stove. If you’re not very familiar with stoves, and even if you are, don’t use it. This blog is written for historical information purposes only. Since Coleman designed, tested and sold this stove, it   Continue reading

Coleman and AGM 520/M1941 stoves

This model stove was used by the U.S. military during World War II. The Coleman version is called the 520 and the American Gas and Machine (AGM) seems to go by model M1941, but it seems that the 520 is the manufacturer’s designation and M1941 is the military designation. I think using either is fine, but it seems like most people call the Coleman a 520 and the AGM, M1941. I have three of these type of stoves an AGM model made in 1941, a Coleman made in 1943 and a Coleman made in 1944. If you’re interested in stoves like this be sure to check out the forums at Coleman Collectors Forum and Spiritburner.  There’s also a brief history of this stove on the wiki. After a period of observation and study, I became aware of the somewhat minor differences between them. I decided to enter it on my blog so I could use it as a reference. I’ll probably add to this post from time-to-time.

(left to right) 1941 AGM, 1943 Coleman, 1944 Coleman

(left to right) 1941 AGM, 1943 Coleman, 1944 Coleman

Tanks

AGM Tanks

AGM tanks are made from steel for 1941-1943 and then brass for 1944 and 1945 (Update 15MAY2016: In the last few months I’ve seen two 1944 AGM tanks which were steel. So, either the information I had is incorrect or AGM switched to brass during 1944 resulting in some 1944 tanks being made from steel and others made from brass). AGM made the brass tanks too thin and they have a tendency Continue reading