M-1942 MOD – Minimal Effort to Blue Flame

M-1942 MOD Stove Outdoors

A 1944, M-1942 MOD Stove

 

Fettle – When used as a verb, “I am going to fettle this stove”, means to set in order, get ready.

So, you’ve got yourself an old stove and you’re thinking, “Let’s see if it works!” after all, if you don’t fire it up how will you know if there’s something wrong with it, right? Well, that would be one dangerous way to discover that the 70 year-old fuel cap gasket or valve stem graphite packing doesn’t seal so well and after you light it you discover, to your surprise, that   Continue reading

Buying an M-1942 Stove

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Here’s a 1945 Prentiss Wabers M-1942 MOD stove as I bought it (left) and after cleaning it up (right)

Last spring, I bought a 1945 Prentiss Wabers M-1942 MOD for $18 at an antique mall. I took it home, cleaned it up, and it works well. This year (2017), I watched a 1943, Aladdin M-1942 wheel stove sell on ebay for $530. Why the big difference?

Well, before we get started, let me say that the market (the buyer and seller) determines the price of an item, which is especially true in the used item market. So, my purpose behind writing this blog is to share observations   Continue reading

The M-1942 “Mountain Stove”

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M-1942 MOD

In November 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Finland in what is known as the Winter War . The battle lasted just over 3 months and ended with the Moscow Peace Treaty in March of 1940. The Soviet forces greatly outnumbered the Finnish military in soldiers, aircraft and tanks, however, their losses were more than 5 times greater. Many around the globe took notice of the Finn’s guerrilla tactics, using ski troopers on cross-country skis and wearing white capes as camouflage. It is also interesting   Continue reading

M1942, 520/M1941 and M1950 Vaporizers

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M1942 Stove (left), 520 Stove (middle), M1950 Stove (right)

Recently, I was asked about the interchangeability of vaporizers between old U.S. Military single-burner stoves. Typically, I try to keep the original vaporizers with the stove as a matter of practice, however, as time goes on and old vaporizers become unusable the need arises to find suitable replacements.

Physically, the vaporizers for the Coleman 520/AGM M1941, M1942 and M1950 are all very similar, so I will compare   Continue reading

North Platte River – Foote to Ft. Steele – Wyoming

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Calm water on the North Platte River, Wyoming

Two years ago I floated the North Platte River between the Foote put-in (North of Saratoga) and the I-80 take-out at the Fort Steele takeout. This year I was invited to float it again with one of the same guys as last time, and his youngest son, and another guy and his youngest son, for a three-day, two night trip on the river. Check out my previous post for additional information.  This year the water flow was   Continue reading

M1942 and M1950 NRV

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M1942 and M1950 stoves

Frustration . . . that’s the word which describes the M1942 and M1950 NRV (Non-Return-Valve), a.k.a. check valve (The Department of the Army Technical manual, TM10-708 calls it the air check valve).  The problem is that the original rubber gaskets get old, dry out, and then fail to seal, allowing fuel to enter the pump tube.  Some people say that this is one of the two primary causes for stove fires on these two stoves.  The other is the pump-tube-to-tank gasket (TM10-708 calls it the filler cap gasket).

The check valve Continue reading

An Old-School Single-burner Stove Gathering

I had planned to go kayaking today but I woke up with a headache this morning. While waiting for it to go away I decided to gather up my stoves up for a photo. I began buying them last summer and worked on them this winter. Today is a 70 degree, sunny mid-March day, so, why not. I will also add that all but one are in functional condition and I’ve been using them on camping and hiking trips.

First up are my 1941 American (AGM), two Coleman 520s and 530 stoves. The 1944, brass tank Coleman still needs to be reassembled but the others are complete. Note that the nickel-plated brass stove on the right is Coleman’s post-war “GI Pocket Stove” version of the WWII stove (it wasn’t used by the military, nor would that thing fit in any of my pockets). The nickel finish was also present on their original 1941 stove for the military. In 1942 they moved to painted steel tanks.

Left to right, AGM 1941, 1943 Coleman 520, 1944 Coleman 520, 1946 (B46) Coleman 530

Left to right, AGM 1941, 1943 Coleman 520, 1944 Coleman 520, 1946 (B46) Coleman 530

Next up are the Prentiss-Waber M1942 stoves, both made in 1945. Some people call these the Mountain Stove as it was used by the US Army’s 10th Mountain Division in WWII. Many people comment that this was the best single-burner stove. I’m not completely sure I agree as I have   Continue reading