The M-1942 “Mountain Stove”

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M-1942 MOD

In November 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Finland in what is known as the Winter War . The battle lasted just over 3 months and ended with the Moscow Peace Treaty in March of 1940. The Soviet forces greatly outnumbered the Finnish military in soldiers, aircraft and tanks, however, their losses were more than 5 times greater. Many around the globe took notice of the Finn’s guerrilla tactics, using ski troopers on cross-country skis and wearing white capes as camouflage. It is also interesting   Continue reading

M1942, 520/M1941 and M1950 Vaporizers

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M1942 Stove (left), 520 Stove (middle), M1950 Stove (right)

Recently, I was asked about the interchangeability of vaporizers between old U.S. Military single-burner stoves. Typically, I try to keep the original vaporizers with the stove as a matter of practice, however, as time goes on and old vaporizers become unusable the need arises to find suitable replacements.

Physically, the vaporizers for the Coleman 520/AGM M1941, M1942 and M1950 are all very similar, so I will compare   Continue reading

Coleman and AGM 520/M1941 stoves

This model stove was used by the U.S. military during World War II. The Coleman version is called the 520 and the American Gas and Machine (AGM) seems to go by model M1941, but it seems that the 520 is the manufacturer’s designation and M1941 is the military designation. I think using either is fine, but it seems like most people call the Coleman a 520 and the AGM, M1941. I have three of these type of stoves an AGM model made in 1941, a Coleman made in 1943 and a Coleman made in 1944. If you’re interested in stoves like this be sure to check out the forums at Coleman Collectors Forum and Spiritburner.  There’s also a brief history of this stove on the wiki. After a period of observation and study, I became aware of the somewhat minor differences between them. I decided to enter it on my blog so I could use it as a reference. I’ll probably add to this post from time-to-time.

(left to right) 1941 AGM, 1943 Coleman, 1944 Coleman

(left to right) 1941 AGM, 1943 Coleman, 1944 Coleman

Tanks

AGM Tanks

AGM tanks are made from steel for 1941-1943 and then brass for 1944 and 1945 (Update 15MAY2016: In the last few months I’ve seen two 1944 AGM tanks which were steel. So, either the information I had is incorrect or AGM switched to brass during 1944 resulting in some 1944 tanks being made from steel and others made from brass). AGM made the brass tanks too thin and they have a tendency Continue reading

An Old-School Single-burner Stove Gathering

I had planned to go kayaking today but I woke up with a headache this morning. While waiting for it to go away I decided to gather up my stoves up for a photo. I began buying them last summer and worked on them this winter. Today is a 70 degree, sunny mid-March day, so, why not. I will also add that all but one are in functional condition and I’ve been using them on camping and hiking trips.

First up are my 1941 American (AGM), two Coleman 520s and 530 stoves. The 1944, brass tank Coleman still needs to be reassembled but the others are complete. Note that the nickel-plated brass stove on the right is Coleman’s post-war “GI Pocket Stove” version of the WWII stove (it wasn’t used by the military, nor would that thing fit in any of my pockets). The nickel finish was also present on their original 1941 stove for the military. In 1942 they moved to painted steel tanks.

Left to right, AGM 1941, 1943 Coleman 520, 1944 Coleman 520, 1946 (B46) Coleman 530

Left to right, AGM 1941, 1943 Coleman 520, 1944 Coleman 520, 1946 (B46) Coleman 530

Next up are the Prentiss-Waber M1942 stoves, both made in 1945. Some people call these the Mountain Stove as it was used by the US Army’s 10th Mountain Division in WWII. Many people comment that this was the best single-burner stove. I’m not completely sure I agree as I have   Continue reading

Old Single-burner Stove Paints and Colors

The Coleman and American 520 single-burner stove, used by the US Military during WWII, sometimes called the M1941, was manufactured between 1941 and 1945. The M1950 single-burner stove was manufactured from 1951 through 1987, was made by several companies, and was painted several different colors over the years. I’d prefer to repaint some of my stoves the original color, or at least a very close match, and this led to a search for correct colors. Of course, it’s a bit difficult to match the original exactly, because I have no idea how much fading has occurred in the last 60 years or so. Close will likely be as good as I can get. For other stoves, I plan to   Continue reading