Kayak, Canoe Shed

I’ve got 4 kayaks, which I built myself, and one canoe. Storing them has become a bit of a problem as two of them have been taking up one of my two garage bays, sitting on the canoe strongback I made a few years ago when building a wood strip canoe for a friend.

I designed the shed last fall, visiting home improvement stores to learn the various construction techniques. Then, in January my second son and I built the floor and walls, but it was too cold to do anything with it. So, it sat outside over the winter. This spring it was rather rainy so it delayed the construction even further. But, summer is in full swing and I’ve been able to make great progress with it. It’s 18 feet long, by 4 feet wide, by 4 feet high and a bit higher at the peak.

The floor leveled and walls framed

The floor leveled and walls framed

As soon as I got the roof on, I moved the boats  out of the garage which forced me to build the racks for the canoe. It’ll be so nice to have my garage/workshop back again!

Test fitting the boats

Test fitting the boats

While I can fit any of my boats in this shed, it is primarily for the Mill Creek 16.5 and the Old Town Penobscot 17. These are the widest and heaviest of my boats.

I used 3/4

I used 3/4″ steel conduit inside 1″ PVC to make some sliders/rollers . . . works nice

Isn’t there some saying about cats and boats? Ours seems to like them based on the paw prints I always see in the deck.

Our cat visiting the boats and boat shed

Our cat visiting the boats and boat shed

Since the photo below was taken, I’ve added a locking latch and caulk. Now for some paint and shingles and it’s done.

Not quite finished, but close

Not quite finished, but close

Update on 25AUG2015: Got it finished with paint and shingles and a lock.

The finished shed

The finished shed

Thanks for visiting my blog.

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10 comments on “Kayak, Canoe Shed

  1. sonicrev7 says:

    Hi Steve,

    Your shed is exactly what we are needing as well! We would be putting a thermoform kayak on the upper shelf. Do you have any suggestions for designing support? I am thinking foam blocks for the bottom, but not sure how to deal with the top.

    Did you include any ventilation for airflow?

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    • sklcolorado says:

      Since I finished the shed near the end of last summer I didn’t add any ventilation. I might still do that, however. I checked the temps inside the shed last year in full sun and it didn’t get too hot. I was looking for a temperature operated vent, though they can get expensive. Can you point me to a photo of the thermoform kayak or one similar? – Steve

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    • Jamie Smith says:

      What about using stretched cargo netting as a support for the kayak? It seems this would give it the varied support it needs. My kayak is fibreglass and I’m worried about it deforming. Any thoughts?

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      • sklcolorado says:

        I haven’t had to deal with glass-only boats, so that’s something new to consider. The canoe manufacturers always suggest that you store canoes upside down, resting on the gunwales and not on the plastic hull itself for the same reason you note. If the cargo netting was attached fully down the length of both sides I think that would work; sort of like a stretcher/litter. Anything less would create pressure points, I think. Yeah, a roller bar on the door end to slide the boat in, and then drop it into the net. I haven’t tried it, so those are just my thoughts. Seems like a good idea, though. As a point of reference, my wood-core, glass-covered kayaks hang in my garage between 4 ceiling hooks and two ropes. I haven’t noticed any deformation after 8 years.

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  2. lunar8nrg says:

    Hi Steve,

    Nice post! Thanks for the post! I really like the shed. I want to make something similar. Do you have the materials list for your shed? My kayak would be able to fit in the shed you designed.

    Mahalo from Maui,
    LL

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    • sklcolorado says:

      I’ll need to look around and see if I still have it. It might be in a notebook.

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      • lunar8nrg says:

        Awesome, that would help! My construction skills would be in the beginner level so having that would make it easier. No worries if you can’t find it.

        Thanks,
        Leo

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    • sklcolorado says:

      Leo,
      I’ve been searching around and haven’t found it yet. You’d think that since I just did it last summer it would be easier to find! The floor is 4′ x 18′, outside dimensions and typical spacing for floor joists are on 2′ centers. The joists are 2″x6″. The two long sides of the shed use one 8′ 2×6 and one 10′ 2×6. I used a third 8’x2’x6″ cut in half so that each half could over lap the boards, making one long joist for each side. Use something strong like lag bolts. Then, using joist hangers and an additional 2×6 cut to the correct length of roughly 4′ (this depends on the location), I joined the two long assemblies together to make the shed floor which looked basically like a big ladder. I then set it in location, leveled it and then added flooring. The walls are 4′ high with studs on 16″ centers. Studs are all 2″x4″. I built the walls on the floor of the garage adn then placed them on the shed. You can see from the photos how that goes together. – Steve

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      • Jon Singh says:

        Hi Steve,

        Im getting ready to build something very similar to this for my two kayaks, since the floor is only 4′ wide, did you put any concrete pier blocks in the center, or did you just go with 6 along the edges?

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      • sklcolorado says:

        Hi Jon, Only along the sides. I used the floor joist hangers available at the building supply for the pieces which stretch between the sides, spaced at typical distances used in home building. So, I used only 6 concrete blocks to support the shed. If this was something I’d be walking on frequently, I’d probably use more, but since it only holds two boats, each under 70 pounds, they should be sufficient. In addition, if you used them on the cross pieces, you could have uneven settling in the ground and cause problems. – Steve

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